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carbs in dairy food, milk, cheese, butter, cream

How many carbs in dairy, milk, cheese, butter, cream and yoghurt.

Depending on the type, the carbs in dairy products vary somewhat. For instance, the carbohydrate content of full cream milk is considerably higher than full cream cheese.

For people on low carb diets or doing keto, it is important to know the carbohydrate content of dairy products.

Dairy is one of the richest sources of calcium which is important for bone health amongst other things.

To see the impact that dairy has on your blood glucose or ketone levels use a ketone monitor after eating.

ketone meters reviews

Getting some sort of dairy into your diet is important. But you need to distinguish which dairy foods are low carb and which are not?

How Many Carbs In Milk?

There are various types of milk available, full cream, buttermilk, skim milk and different levels of reduced-fat milk.

The different kinds of milk vary in fat content with a slight variation in carbohydrates and protein.

As the fat is reduced the carbs in milk are increased.

Carbohydrates In Milk (per cup)

Cows milk is generally considered unsuitable for the ketogenic diet and Atkins. Some low carb practitioners do consume it, but not if they’re wanting to get into ketosis.

  • Full cream milk = 12g carbs, 8g fat, 8g protein
  • 2% milk = 12g carbs, 3.5g fat, 8g protein
  • 1% milk: 13g carbs, 2.5g fat, 8g protein
  • Skim milk = 13g carbs, 0g fat, 8g protein

The carbs in milk are too high for the keto diet. So we do not consume dairy (cows) milk in our diet or use it in our low carb recipes.

We do use various nut milk on occasion, however.  Such as almond, macadamia and coconut milk (in small portions as recipe ingredients mostly). But these are not dairy products.

How Many Carbs In Cheese?

Generally speaking, the carbs in cheese are very low. Most cheeses are made up of primarily fat and protein.

Cheese is also very low in lactose (sugar in milk) compared to milk.

If in doubt read the nutrition label and check for the sugar content.

If you’re lactose intolerant and to keep carbs to a minimum avoid fresh cheeses (and consult your specialist).

Carbohydrates In Cheese (per 1oz)

Cheese comes in many forms from cream cheese, soft cheese, cured and hard cheeses.

  • Cheddar Cheese = 0.4g carbs, 9.4g fat, 7g protein
  • Colby Cheese = 0.7g carbs, 9.1g fat, 6.7g protein
  • Cream Cheese = 1.2g carbs, 9.7g fat, 1.7g protein
  • Mozzarella Cheese = 0.6g carbs, 6.3g fat, 6.3g protein
  • Parmesan Cheese = 0.9g carbs, 7.3g fat, 10g protein
  • Swiss Cheese = 1.5g carbs, 7.9 fat, 7.6g protein
  • Feta = 1.2g carbs, 6g fat, 4g protein
  • Brie = 0.1g carbs, 7.9g fat, 5.9g protein

Delicious Low Carb Cheese Recipes

We use cheese extensively throughout our low carb recipes.

The carbs in cheese make it a versatile ingredient.

The cheese we use will depend on the type of low carb dish we’re cooking.

  1. Easy Low Carb Cheese Chips
  2. Ketogenic Three Cheese Pie
  3. LCHF Ham and Cheese Omelette
  4. Easy Low Carb Cheese and Bacon Cauliflower Casserole
  5. Low Carb Vanilla Cheesecake Fat Bombs

How Many Carbs in Cream?

Full cream is a great alternative (when used by the tablespoon) to milk for people on a ketogenic or other low carb diets.

The carbs in cream compared to fat and protein is very low.

Use one tablespoon in a cup of coffee or tea as a low-carb, high-fat option.

Be aware that while heavy cream is low carb, the high-fat makes one full cup a whopping 820 calories.

Carbohydrates In Cream (per tablespoon)

Try and avoid low-fat versions and keep your portions small when consuming cream.

  • Heavy Cream = 0.4g carbs, 5.6g fat, 0.3g protein
  • Half and Half = 0.6g, 1.7g fat, 0.4g protein
  • Sour Cream = 0.5g carbs, 2.5g fat, 0.4g protein

Low Carb Cream Recipes

Full fat cream makes up a good part of many of our keto recipes.

Cream being low in carbs and high in fat makes it an ideal food thickener and gives a richer, smoother flavor.

  1. Low Carb Cherry Cream Cookie Bars
  2. Low Carb Raspberry & Chocolate Cream Pie
  3. Raspberry Cream Fat Bombs
  4. Keto Ice Cream Recipe – Low Carb Chocolate
  5. Low Carb Key Lime Pie

How Many Carbs In Butter?

Butter is a staple for people on low-carb, high-fat diets such as the Keto Diet and Atkins Diet.

How many carbs in butter then? Just about zero.

The amount of carbohydrate in butter is negligible. You’d probably burn that carb taking the butter out of the fridge.

Butter has virtually no carbs, almost no protein and is almost entirely made of fat.

Carbohydrates In Butter (per tablespoon)

Keeping butter on hand is key to a successful ketogenic diet. Almost pure fat and full of flavor, butter is the swiss army knife of LCHF eating. The carbs in butter are very low.

  • Salted & Unsalted Butter = 0.1g carbs, 11.5g fat, 0.1g protein
  • Clarified Butter (Ghee) = 0 carbs, 12.5g fat, 0g protein

Butter can be used in various ways in low carb recipes.

low carb butter recipes

We make a lot of low carb butter recipes.

We make a variety of flavored compound butter recipes to add to our meat dishes.

Lemon and Chive Compound Butter Great with chicken and fish.

Classic Garlic Flavored Compound Butter great on most low carb meat dishes

Chili Flavored Compound Butter for those who like it a bit bitey!

Pesto Flavored Compound Butter for steaks and lamb dishes.

How Many Carbs In Yoghurt

Personally, I avoid yoghurt on a ketogenic diet. The carbs in yoghurt throw me out of ketosis, I’m quite sensitive to sudden carbohydrate intake.

But the number of carbs in yoghurt may fit in with your low carb diet if ketosis isn’t what you’re aiming for.

The best low carbohydrate option for LCHF diets is full-fat Greek yoghurt.

Carbohydrates in Yogurt ( 1 cup)

  • Full Fat Greek Yogurt = 9.1g carbs, 11.4g fat, 20.4g protein
  • 2% Greek Yogurt = 9.1g carbs, 4.5g fat, 22.7g protein
  • 0% (fat free) Greek Yogurt) = 9.3g carbs, 0g fat, 24g protein

There you have it. From the list above you can work out which dairy products fit in with your diets macros.

Carbs in dairy vary by product as seen by the carbohydrate difference between milk, cheese and butter.